10 Myths About Autism

myth busting  There is such a lot of ignorance about autism around, I blame the Government for not raising awareness with public service announcements, lack of realistic representations in the media and lack of training for those who need to have the awareness.

Here are some of those myths:

  1. Autistic people have no/severely impaired theory of mind – utter tosh, read this article: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2006-02/uow-eqp021606.php;
  2. Autistic people have no empathy – there are several types of empathy: cognitive – being aware/accepting of, the feelings and views of others, affective – also known as sympathy, are two of those types and whilst we may have some impairment in cognitive empathy we most definitely have sympathy http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3494975/;
  3. Autistic people do not have feelings/show affection – we may show them differently at times, but I can assure you we most definitely have them and and whilst some people on the spectrum dislike hugs for sensory reasons, many of us are very huggable on our own terms;
  4. Autistic people do not love – we can love intensely, see the Intense World Theory of autism to see how we may actually experience the world more deeply than NTs https://medium.com/matter-archive/the-boy-whose-brain-could-unlock-autism-70c3d64ff221 and some spectrumites even have a person as the object of their special interest (we’re not talking stalkers here!):
  5. Autistic people do not get married or have families – where do you think all the autistic children are coming from! Many have autistic parents and it is largely a genetic/epigenetic condition, what is clear is that divorce rates can be high among ASC/NT marriages but then they are high in the general population too;
  6. Autistic people are violent – we are no more violent than anyone else, meltdowns are a state of overwhelmedness not aggression or violence and like everyone else, we are also a product of our upbringing, environment and life experiences, do not confuse us with sociopaths and psychopaths.  In fact, people on the spectrum are more likely to fall victim to violence than the average person.  (There can be co-morbid conditions such as ADHD which can make an autistic child especially, tending towards aggression but autism itself does not cause violent tendencies);
  7. Autistic people are mostly male – my belief is that the real ratio is actually 1:1. Because diagnostic criteria were researched and written on males, they do not take into account female presentation of the condition and therefore many females have failed to get diagnosed.   Slowly awareness is rising (although still not anywhere near good enough) and diagnoses of females are increasing, with clinics such as the UK Lorna Wing Centre currently estimating the ratio at 2.5:1 even though the official UK statistics are often quoted at their lowest, at 4:1;
  8. Autistic people all have learning disabilities/low IQ – even at the lowest functioning end of the spectrum, whilst the individual can appear to be locked into their own world and non-verbal, they can still be intelligent (look up Carly Fleischmann). To have an Asperger’s diagnosis you must have an IQ of >70 and they don’t call Asperger’s the geek syndrome for nothing – but that doesn’t mean we are all savants either, pro rata I would guess that people with AS/HFA number as overall more intelligent than the average population of NTs;
  9. Autistic people cannot hide their condition – at the higher functioning end, many of us (especially females) mask our condition – at great expense to ourselves. In fact, it is the higher-functioning autistics that end up with the most risk of anxiety and depression out of all autistic people, due to self-awareness and feeling forced to fit in with society and not getting any support for their condition;
  10. Autism is a mental illness – this is utterly false, it is a neurodevelopmental/neurobehavioural condition, in which the brain is wired slightly differently. It is not a mental illness and it’s a shame that assessment and diagnosis of the condition usually falls under the mental health services umbrella because this perpetuates the myth. In mental health services, people encounter psychiatrists and psychologists who may legally be qualified to assess and diagnose ASC, but are often not experienced or well-trained in it and therefore many adults end up wrongly in the mental health system, misdiagnosed and wrongly medicated, which sadly can in itself produce mental ill-health as a result.

So, Jeremy Hunt, MP and Secretary of State for Health – when are you going to start doing something about the lack of autism awareness?

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